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Open source in an economic downturn

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OSS

We are in an economic downturn, perhaps even a full-blown recession. In these circumstances the IT budget is one of the first places to come under scrutiny, and most IT departments are coming under increasing pressure to save every penny.

And there is a particular lack of grace to the position the IT department finds itself in - not only is it's own budget falling, but the proprietary vendors with which it deals need to ensure their own survival during a recession, and I'll let you imagine how flexible those providers will be in price negotiations if they are in a monopoly position and know you have no choice.

Open Source software has many virtues, but one above all others is suited to the current economic environment - it enables you to strategically cut costs more than any other IT tool available to you.

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