Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

21st Century Desktops, Linux or Windows, Does It Matter?

Filed under
OS

It is with considerable amusement I view the verbal skirmishes between the gathering Linux and Windoze factions, almost like watching differing Religious sects gather. There are obvious advantages to each O.S. and the philosophy's behind their development, one system having the ability to accommodate the users needs with minimal to no CLI intervention, you don't have to make any decisions, they have been made for you. The alternative OS family gives you infinite control of all aspects of the system, very good for some, very bad for others.

If your O.S. does what you want it to do and you can tolerate the things it does that you don't want it to do, I couldn't be happier.

At this point almost no one remembers what we call a GUI had nothing to do with Bill Gates, in 1974 Xerox introduced a hand full of demonstration “Alto” systems with a fully functional GUI, multi button mouse and office suite. in the following years Amiga workbench, Amiga dos, tons of games and applications, the Amiga 3000 ran a 68000 @ 30 MHz, (32 buss ) it multi tasked flawlessly and rendered complex graphics at a speed that still leaves the uninitiated with sticky drawers.

More Here




More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: Software

today's howtos

ACPI, kernels and contracts with firmware

This ends up being a pain in the neck in the x86 world, but it could be much worse. Way back in 2008 I wrote something about why the Linux kernel reports itself to firmware as "Windows" but refuses to identify itself as Linux. The short version is that "Linux" doesn't actually identify the behaviour of the kernel in a meaningful way. "Linux" doesn't tell you whether the kernel can deal with buffers being passed when the spec says it should be a package. "Linux" doesn't tell you whether the OS knows how to deal with an HPET. "Linux" doesn't tell you whether the OS can reinitialise graphics hardware. Read more