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Ubuntu on the Asus eee 901

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Ubuntu

I recently wrote about my frustrations with the 901 model of the Asus eee PC. My solution, at least for now, is to load Ubuntu, and I have done so. Here is a not-so-brief rundown of what I did, what issues still exist, and my general impressions of Ubuntu on a device like this.

Post Install:

Quite a few things are broken with Ubuntu on the 901, and a bit of work is needed to fix them. I have not addressed them all them all yet, but my eee 901 with Ubuntu is currently working fine. The big problem with Ubuntu at the moment is that at install BOTH wired and wireless networking don’t work, but the fix is surprisingly easy. Download the custom kernel from http://array.org/ubuntu/setup901.html and save it to a flash drive. Once you have installed and rebooted just install the new kernel as described on the Array site, reboot and networking now works just fine.

An external USB drive won’t mount unless you do so manually or remove or comment out the cdrom line from /etc/fstab as it seems to cause a conflict. Once done external drives work fine.

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Also: Installing Ubuntu 8.04 on the Eee PC 901

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