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Putting A 'Korset' On The Spread Of Computer Viruses

Filed under
Software
Security

Anti-virus companies play a losing game. Casting their nets wide, they catch common, malicious viruses and worms (known to the industry as “malware”), but it may take days before their software updates can prepare your computer for the next attack. By then it could be too late. And some insidious programs prove immune to anti-virus software, residing inside your computer for months or even years, collecting personal information and business secrets.

But Prof. Avishai Wool and his graduate student Ohad Ben-Cohen of Tel Aviv University’s Faculty of Engineering are taking a different approach. They recently unveiled a unique new program called the “Korset” to stop malware on Linux, the operating system used by the majority of web and email servers worldwide. Prof. Wool’s technology puts a new spin on Internet security, and once it reaches its full potential it could put anti-virus software companies out of business. The research was presented at the Black Hat Internet security conference in Las Vegas this summer.

Stopping the Virus Before It Starts

Prof. Wool and Ben-Cohen have built an open-source software solution for servers that run on Linux.

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