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Vector Linux Partners With SQI To Provide Support Infrastructure

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Linux

Vector Linux, the decade old Canadian Linux distribution based on Slackware, has partnered with SQI Incorporated of Reno, Nevada to provide support infrastructure, both for the commercial support Vector Linux began offering earlier this year and for the wider community. SQI is providing and hosting their Incident Manager software, a ticketing system specifically for paid support customers, as well as a knowledge base available to all Vector Linux users. In addition to providing the software for the knowledge base they are assisting with content creation. The new Vector Linux website which was unveiled in July is also hosted by SQI in what SQI President Jeff Elpern describes as a "world-class data center environment."

Linux distributions break down into three rough categories: major commercial distributions with large corporate ties and/or deep-pocketed investors. Red Hat/Fedora, SuSe, Ubuntu, and TurboLinux would all be examples of large, commercial Linux distributions. The other end of the spectrum is filled with many small distros built either by a single hobbyist/developer or a small community of volunteer developers. These distributions generally have little or no income, surviving on the goodwill of the developers and perhaps small contributions from devoted users. Vector Linux fits squarely into the middle group: mid-sized distributions with a significant user and developer community but no large corporate ties.

When the Vector Linux developers created the larger SOHO (Small Office, Home Office) edition of the distribution a few years ago they identified a target market: small business users.

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