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Windows Guy Tries Linux Mint

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Linux

After our initial foray into the Linux world with openSuse 11, my plan had been to try Mandriva Spring 2008. It’s still in the cards, but based on the overwhelming support that Linux Mint got in the comment section, I decided that maybe that should be my next Distro to examine.

After making sure everything looked OK with the LiveCD bootup, I decided to just go ahead an install. This time I’ve decided that I’m junking my current Windows directory so i don’t mind if we overwrite it. That’s not to say I’ve given up on Windows and become an convert - it is to say I was sick of Vista and wanted to format anyhow. Might as well do it now Smile

A typical install screen comes up when I click on the big INSTALL icon on the desktop. From my very very small experience with Ubuntu from long ago, it looks familiar. The first step is to pick a language. Now as much as I would love to pick Esperanto (why is that there??) I pick English and hit Forward (see not Next, we’ve left Redmond far behind I guess) and we are presented with the Date and Time screen.

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Mint is great for

Mint is great for newcomers.

I prefer Ubuntu myself.

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