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How to Read an Analyst's Report

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft's "Get the Facts" advertising campaign makes the claim that Windows offers a lower total cost of ownership (TCO) than Linux, and backs it up with reports from well-known analysts. But Linux advocates claim that the TCO of Linux is lower, and some other studies back them up. It's time to clear up the confusion.

In this series of articles, we examine these analyst reports in detail, separating the truth from the hype. But first, a little background is in order.

Let's start with the basics of TCO, since most of the studies measure it.

Full Story.

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