Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Review: SUSE 10, on the Road

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

I'm on vacation this week. For me, though, vacation includes carrying around my Linux-powered laptop.

So while, you're going to have to wait for a while for my full review of SUSE 10, I had to let you know sooner than later about how SUSE 10 handles on the road.

Why? Because unlike most Linux desktop distributions, OpenSUSE and Novell's SUSE 10 works extremely well as a road warrior operating system.

Full Review.

Also on Linux-Watch:

My colleague, Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols, just posted a story praising a new Linux distribution from SuSE. After formatting the story, and posting it on the site, I read the story, and decided it might be fun to take a look.

I have not tried SuSE since about 1999. Back then, YaST was closed source, and seemingly every single configuration option lived in one enormous master configuration file somewhere in /etc. This all seemed very German, somehow. Very organized, and very large.

But ever since YaST went open source, the distribution seems to be taking over more and more of my friends' computers every year. Why not try it out again, I thought?

I got as far as the download page, where I was offered a choice of about half a dozen different SuSE 10 distributions. Some came from Novell, some from the OpenSuSE project, some were DVD-based, some were based on CDs. Hm, I thought. Is it finally time to see if the DVD burner in my little mini-ITX system can actually be made to work under Linux?

No, I decided, it's not. Why would anyone distribute an operating system on DVD, or even CD-ROM nowadays? It just doesn't make any sense. CDs are a throw-back to the era of boxed retail OS sets -- very 90s.

Installing Linux from a DVD is so... last decade.

More in Tux Machines

KDevelop 5.0.0 release

Almost two years after the release of KDevelop 4.7, we are happy to announce the immediate availability of KDevelop 5.0. KDevelop is an integrated development environment focusing on support of the C++, Python, PHP and JavaScript/QML programming languages. Many important changes and refactorings were done for version 5.0, ensuring that KDevelop remains maintainable and easy to extend and improve over the next years. Highlights include much improved new C/C++ language support, as well as polishing for Python, PHP and QML/JS. Read more

CoreOS 1068.10.0 Released with Many systemd Fixes, Still Using Linux Kernel 4.6

Today, August 23, 2016, the development team behind the CoreOS security-oriented GNU/Linux operating system have released the CoreOS 1068.10.0 stable update, along with new ISO images for all supported platforms. Read more

SUSE Linux and openSUSE Leap to Offer Better Support for ARM Systems Using EFI

The YaST development team at openSUSE and SUSE is reporting on the latest improvements that should be available in the upcoming openSUSE Leap 42.2 and SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2 operating systems. Read more

Create modular server-side Java apps direct from mvn modules with diet4j instead of an app server

In the latest release, the diet4j module framework for Java has learned to run modular Java apps using the Apache jsvc daemon (best known from running Tomcat on many Linux distros). If org.example.mydaemon is your top Maven project, all you do is specify it as the root module for your jsvc invocation, and diet4j figures out the dependencies when jsvc starts. An example systemd.service file is available.