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Switched From Ubuntu To Gentoo

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Gentoo
Ubuntu

Ubuntu has served me well for a few months, I think it was April when I started using it. I have to say Ubuntu is one of my favorite Linux distributions. It’s great for people who are new to Linux or have been using Windows for a long time and want to try out something different or more reliable.

My Quick Review on Ubuntu

The User Experience:
Ubuntu blows me away at how easy it is to use and set up! It’s quick and reliable. There’s no huge learning curve(you might have to learn 5 or 6 simple commands) and it’s really straight forward. You can even demo it, without installing, to see if you like it(Note that the speeds on the demo are much slower). Linux gives you so much freedom compared to Windows. The second you turn it on you love it. It opens up a new world of possibilities, it’s free and apps are free. Also, you can run Windows programs—the ones that you really need—in a virtual machine called Wine. Unlike Windows, Ubuntu has only crashed on me ONCE. So yeah, you can live without Windows.

...

…but I chose to switch to Gentoo.




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