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Gentoo 2008.0 Desktop - Stable now

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Gentoo

Due to my busy schedule of the previous week, it actually took me roughly a week to finally get my Gentoo 2008.0 Desktop and configured. This is the first time in over two years that I actually got a fully functional Gentoo system. I even got 3D direct rendering working with nvidia and xorg.

Installing Gentoo this time took longer than expected since I had some SATA2 drive problems. Turns out I needed to enable AHCI in bios to get the SATA2 hard drives (I use two of them now) to work properly. The Gentoo Linux x86 Handbook has been updated making the installation process go a little more faster (A Newbie should have no problems installing Gentoo now if they are willing to spend some time reading).

As in the past, I decided to use Daniel Robbin’s stage 3 tarbells. It took me a couple hours to actually complete the installation due to poor bandwidth here in Vietnam last Sunday. I did have some USE flags problems in the beginning but I was able to fix them and compile the kernel for this system. I spent some time researching online on the various kernel options I would need before compiling. In the end, it worked out and I got a working kernel.

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My Gentoo Goal

My goal is to keep my Gentoo system stable for one month without having to rebuild it. I hope Portage 2 will keep my system from breaking Smile

Blog: http://www.saigonnezumi.com"
Vscapeone - Vietnam
http://www.vscapeone.com

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