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sound in mandriva 2009.0

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2008.1 went well and the decision to default to using PulseAudio turned out to be pretty good all in all. I made it my mission to ensure that we had as smooth as possible an integration and have continued to follow up as many bug reports as my time permits. I've actually been pretty surprised that there were not more issues and it all seemed to go surprisingly smoothly! Mandriva were given specific mention when the PulseAudio author, Lennart Pottering, talked about distro roll out of pulseaudio: "Some distributions did a better job adopting PulseAudio than others. On the good side I certainly have to list Mandriva, Debian, and Fedora. OTOH Ubuntu didn't exactly do a stellar job.". I'm very glad to say that Ubuntu has learned from this mistake and I've spoken several times to the guy who is now looking after pulse integration and things will definitely be better for them!

Anyway, what about 2009? Well not a huge amount has changed with pulse to be honest. We're not going to be shipping the 0.9.12 version of pulse this time round. It's still too unstable at the moment (as Lennart himself admits!) but I provide it in the cooker testing repository for those that want to play with it. So we're going with 0.9.10 (0.9.11 was when "glitch free" landed which is why things are not yet rock solid). This is not actually much different to our 0.9.9 version which I had patched fairly heavily. I have included my own experimental support for Apple Airtunes devices in the Mandriva packages. paprefs allows you to tick a box. It's not perfect yet by any means but some users may find it useful!

And what about the sound in KDE?




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