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KDE 4.1.2 tagged, gentoo land frozen

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KDE
Gentoo

On July 29th, KDE 4.1, the first almost usable KDE version since the 3.5 branch, has been released, and since then guess what happened in the gentoo-kde land ? Nothing. By nothing I mean first that not a single ebuild, even masked, even hard masked, has reached the official portage tree, and secondly, that despite the huge KDE user base in Gentoo, not a single official statement has been done concerning this issue. Because, believe me or not, there is an actual issue. Nothing was said on the main Gentoo page, almost nothing on gentoo planet (only one post focused on whether kde should install in a different place or not). In the gentoo land, everybody speaks about everything but KDE in gentoo. Has the meaning of ‘g’ in gentoo recently changed ?

When you try to know a little bit more about this, it’s getting worse. Rumors are that developers have fought each others and the kde team is just no more. It’s a new KDE team that is here for whatever reason (to which, by the way, I send my very best support, for the development of new ebuilds, for being put under such light/pressure, and for being sent in this lion’s cage that seems to be gentoo devs). I don’t know anything about this, but it’s not the first time I hear about huge tensions between gentoo developers, and this worries me a lot.

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State of KDE 4.1 in Gentoo

Jan Kundrat: It's been some time since KDE 4.1 was tagged. Gentoo, which used to be one of the most bleeding-edge distribution, has apparently failed to deliver this highly expected product to its mainstream users. We already have even a KDE developer complaining about what a miserable job we did. Well, I'm not going to deny the fact that the lack of KDE 4.1 in Portage probably doesn't make users happy, but let's see what the reasons are. Perhaps I can even persuade the P. T. reader that the statement "nothing happened in the Gentoo land" is false Smile.

Preparing a package for a source-based distribution is not as easy as rolling out a binary package. The KDE team went ahead and instead of keeping using the same hacks that were employed in kde-3 ebuilds, they drafted a new revision of EAPI. Yep, there were personal issues involved as well.

So, what about a KDE 4.1 package? What? You thought that it is not available? Oh sure it is! It isn't in the main tree, but available through an overlay.

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