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Ubuntu Server Team Wants to Know – How do you Ubuntu?

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Ubuntu

Co-sponsored by Canonical and RedMonk, Survey Asks Community about its Server Usage

LONDON, September 25, 2008 – Canonical Ltd., the commercial sponsor of Ubuntu, is asking users of Ubuntu Server edition just exactly how they are using it and in what kind of organisations.

Ubuntu is the popular Linux distribution for the desktop, laptop, thin client and server which brings together the best of open source software every 6 months. Ubuntu is free, and is downloaded from mirror sites around the world.

The Ubuntu Server community wants to ask a broad set of users to share their experiences. A previous shorter survey from Canonical was completed (public results at: http://www.canonical.com/campaign/serversurvey) by those requesting free server CDs, but this is the first time the Ubuntu server team is requesting information from the community worldwide.

Co-sponsored by RedMonk Research, the survey (http://survey.ubuntu.com/) will gather more detailed knowledge in order to:

 Improve future product releases
 Prioritize feature requests
 Guide partnerships to add technologies
 Drive the focus at the next Ubuntu Developer Summit in December 2008 (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/UDS)

The anonymous survey takes 10 to 20 minutes to complete and is open to anyone deploying Linux servers today, whether or not they use Ubuntu. The Ubuntu Server Community Team will present the results in the beginning of December.

“Our survey earlier this year provided insight into the diversity and global reach of the Ubuntu Server customer base,” said Nick Barcet, Ubuntu Server product manager at Canonical. “With this survey, we hope to understand more about them – including how they are using our software in their businesses – in order to better serve them in the future.”

About Canonical and Ubuntu
Canonical, the commercial sponsor of Ubuntu, is headquartered in Europe and is committed to the development, distribution and support of open source software products and communities. World-class 24x7 commercial support for Ubuntu is available through Canonical's global support team and partners.
Since its launch in October 2004, Ubuntu has become one of the most highly regarded Linux distributions with millions of users around the world.

Ubuntu will always be free to download, free to use and free to distribute to others. With these goals in mind, Ubuntu aims to be the most widely used Linux system, and is the centre of a global open source software ecosystem. For more information visit www.canonical.com or www.ubuntu.com.

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Contact: Bill Baker, Baker Communications Group, 860-350-9100, pr@canonical.com

When I find Ubuntu on a

When I find Ubuntu on a server (one that I haven't installed/configured) I usually start by Uninstalling it immediately. I also try NOT to install it on any hardware I'm using to prevent those nasty upgrade problems.

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