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50 significant moments from internet history

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Web

We decided to plough the history of the entire internet, from the roots of its underlying technology, to the Web properties that helped it explode, the litigation it endured on the way and disasters companies have suffered as a result of the Net's popularity. We've picked 50 of what we think are the most significant moments, in 10 categories spanning almost 40 years of internet history:

So, without further ado, we'll begin over the page with some of the earliest days of the internet as we know it, in 1974.

FEB 1966

ARPANET, as it would become, was not in fact a Command and Control System that would survive a nuclear attack, but simply a military computer network for sharing data across long distances. It influenced the creation of the internet, and was initially instigated by a $1m funding by then-ARPA director Charlie Herzfeld, to then-IPTO director Bob Taylor, a Texan.

MAY 1974

A Protocol for Packet Network Interconnection was a paper published in 1974 by Vinton G Cerf and Robert E Kahn. It detailed what would eventually be called TCP/IP — the packet-switching technology that makes the entire internet possible. It's what gets your data from A to Z, even if most of the internet implodes, and is possibly the most significant development in Net history.

OCT 1984

Described as "administrative entities", internet pioneer Dr Jon Postel introduces the top-level domains .com, .org, .gov, .edu and .mil in one of a series of documents called Request For Comments, which were papers published by the Internet Engineering Task Force. Postel also ran and managed the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority, which was set up to coincide with the introduction of the domains.

JUN 1987

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