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Vendors rush to fix critical TCP/IP bug

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Security

Internet infrastructure vendors are rushing to develop patches for a set of TCP/IP security flaws, which could help hackers knock servers offline with very little effort.

The security community has been buzzing about the bugs since Tuesday, when security researcher Robert Hansen discussed the problem on his blog.

Technical details on the vulnerabilities have not been released, but the security experts at Outpost24, who discovered the problem, Robert Lee and Jack Louis, have said that they can knock Windows, Linux, embedded systems and even firewalls offline with what's known as a denial of service (DOS) attack. The flaws lie in the TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol) software used by these systems to send data over the Internet.

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