Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Review: PC-BSD 7

Filed under
BSD

Recently the PC-BSD team released their latest stable version (PC-BSD 7) code-named Fibonacci Edition. Some of major changes from the previous version include a newer kernel, an experimental ZFS module, and a KDE 4 for desktop environment. Being a Linux junkie, I thought of this as a perfect opportunity to venture into the BSD arena.

I decided to install PC-BSD 7 on two different computers, an old laptop (test machine) and a fairly powerful desktop (my workstation). PC-BSD is currently available only in a 32-bit version. But the install image is available for different mediums including CD, DVD, USB etc. I grabbed the DVD image which had the default packages and some optional components. The installation starts in the text mode with a menu that provides a list of options. These include emergency command prompt mode, launching graphical installer, ZFS installer module, etc. I chose the default installation for the Laptop and the ZFS installation on the desktop. Once the installation started it transitioned into a GUI installer, which took me through six simple steps:

More Here




More in Tux Machines

Why Docker, Containers and systemd Drive a Wedge Through the Concept of Linux Distributions

The announcement of Rocket by CoreOS was perceived by many to be a direct challenge to Docker, particularly as it came on the eve of DockerCon Europe and threatened to overshadow news coming out at the event. Docker, Inc. CEO Ben Golub was quick to fire back with his ‘initial thoughts on the Rocket announcement’. This piece isn’t about the politics of ecosystems and VC funded startups, which I’ll leave to Colin Humphreys (and note an excellent response from Docker Founder and CTO Solomon Hykes). It also isn’t about managing open source community, which I’ll leave to Matt Asay. Here I want to look at systemd, which lies at the heart of the technical arguments. Read more

Can Ubuntu Click Address Linus Torvalds’ Binary Problems?

Linux is a dominant player in almost every industry segment, minus one: desktop. We heard Linus Torvalds’ pain when he uttered these words at LinuxCon North America this year, "I still want the desktop". What’s holding desktop Linux back? There are many factors including marketing, pre-loaded Windows, support for hardware, and availability of applications. Linus, the creator of the Linux kernel, doesn't offer executables aka binaries of his own software Sub Surface for Linux desktop even though he does offer binaries for Mac OSX and Windows. Read more

Google building full Android IVI stack, says report

If Android M is for real, the technology would go far beyond its Android Auto initiative announced earlier this year. Android Auto offers Apple CarPlay-like extensions to existing Android apps for customized interactions with a wide variety of IVI navigation and multimedia systems. IVI systems that support Android Auto should begin to appear in cars sometime in 2015. Read more

Most important open source news of the year

In 2014, we have seen continued growth for both use and adoption of open source software in the enterprise software market. Cloud takes a big part of that obviously, with project likes Docker and OpenStack who have been in the news frequently. But growth wasn't limited to increased use and adoption. We also noticed a lot of big names open sourcing their own solutions. Facebook announced a new branch of MySQL built for scalability, NASA released source code for many software projects, GitHub released the Atom text editor under a MIT license, and Google open sourced an email encryption tool and it's Chrome PDF engine. The biggest news this year when it comes to open sourcing software has been Microsoft with .Net. This list of new open source releases goes on, with companies like LinkedIn, organizations such as DARPA, and more. If this trend continues, we can expect a lot more to be released under an open source license in 2015. Read more