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Linux Netbooks Are Returned 4X More Than Win XP Versions, Says MSI

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Linux

Netbooks were supposed to be this great inroad for Linux development, but it turns out that the XP side of the netbook business is doing a lot better in the area of customer satisfaction: MSI today told Laptop that, according to internal studies, "The return rate is at least four times higher for Linux netbooks than Windows XP netbooks."

We have done a lot of studies on the return rates and haven’t really talked about it much until now. Our internal research has shown that the return of netbooks is higher than regular notebooks, but the main cause of that is Linux. People would love to pay $299 or $399 but they don’t know what they get until they open the box. They start playing around with Linux and start realizing that it’s not what they are used to. They don’t want to spend time to learn it so they bring it back to the store. The return rate is at least four times higher for Linux netbooks than Windows XP netbooks.

Seen Here, quoting this interview




It all comes down to familiarity and coolness

People want familiarity. XP is familiar. What they will do, is learn something new if it's really cool, which is the case with OS X. Linux doesn't fit in either class.

Linux will gain momentum with the general public rather slowly. Not all of these netbooks are being returned. Some are being converted to XP by the users, and some are just left as is. When enough of those that decide to use the installed version of Linux grow, Linux will win new friends and expand.

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