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Linux Game of the Month : Pingus

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Gaming

After spending any amount of time playing (and yes, when necessary, working) with Linux systems, you can't help but notice that penguins do tend to figure prominently in the mythos of the operating system. Penguins show up everywhere — from the Linux mascot, Tux (designed by Larry Ewing), to the numerous variations on the penguin theme, you can't go near a Linux system, magazine, T-shirt, mouse pad, coffee mug, or book, without running into some kind of penguin. That's okay for most people because, well, penguins are cute. If you want to know who is responsible for this whole penguin-mania, blame Linus Torvalds, Linux's creator. When asked what he envisioned for a mascot, Linus replied, "You should be imagining a slightly overweight penguin (*), sitting down after having gorged itself, and having just burped. It's sitting there with a beatific smile — the world is a good place to be when you have just eaten a few gallons of raw fish and you can feel another 'burp' coming."

I'm from the "I think penguins are cute" camp and happen to like running into them on a regular basis. I also enjoy games that feature penguins, such as Ingo Ruhnke's Pingus (Figure 1). This is a game based on the classic Lemmings game (circa 1991) where you assist some friendly little creatures in escaping various dangers. Pingus, however, is much more than a clone. It has become a classic in its own right. It does, however, have a few limitations, which I'll tell you about later. First, I want to tell you the Pingus story.

Full Article.

emerge pingus

he makes me wanna play again. Smile

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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