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Dell Launches Consumer Advertising for Ubuntu Linux PCs

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Ubuntu

It’s one small step for Dell and consumer Linux — and one giant leap for Canonical’s Ubuntu Linux efforts. Specifically, Dell is spending advertising dollars to promote PCs with Ubuntu Linux preinstalled. The move has significant implications for the business world as well. Here’s why.

First, some details about the advertisement. Many many U.S. newspapers on Sunday, October 12, included a multi-page Dell flier. Among the many products advertised was the Dell Inspiron Mini 9, a low-cost sub-notebook designed for email and Web browsing.

You may recall that the Mini 9 is available with either Ubuntu Linux 8.04 or Microsoft Windows Vista. But this particular advertisement made no mention of the Windows option. Instead, Ubuntu Vista was prominently mentioned and had the spotlight to itself.

The Bigger Picture




Ubuntu Vista???

>> Instead, Ubuntu Vista was prominently mentioned and had the spotlight to itself.

Fortunately this is just in the preview here, and not in the actual article linked.

re: ubuntu vista?

well, he musta saw it and fixed it cuz I did a direct copy and paste of his text.

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