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Annual Kaspersky Labs Fearmongering (2008 Edition)!

Back in 2007, I posted this:

Annual Kaspersky Labs Fearmongering!
http://www.tuxmachines.org/node/15082

Its been a while, and I thought Kaspersky Labs were going to miss this year...But I was wrong!

Mac, Linux, BSD open for attack: Kaspersky
http://www.computerworld.com.au/index.php/id;264209080;fp;16;fpid;0

Yeap, the boogieman, Eugene Kaspersky is BACK! In this year's adventure, no OS is safe!

For convenience, check out the following...

In 2006.

The case of the non-viral virus
http://www.linux.com/feature/53534
(Guess who was blowing their horn about it? Yeap! => Kaspersky Labs)

Torvalds creates patch for cross-platform virus
http://www.linux.com/articles/53727
(Just to mock Kaspersky Labs.)

OpenOffice.org virus debunked by experts
http://www.linux.com/feature/54824
(Oh gee, I wonder who discovered it? => Kaspersky Labs)

In 2007.

iPod virus scare stories are here
http://www.theinquirer.net/en/inquirer/news/2007/04/06/ipod-virus-scare-stories-are-here
(Install Linux on an iPod...Kaspersky Labs and ANOTHER "proof of concept" malware!)

All this raises the key question...

Can the malware industry be trusted?
http://www.linux.com/feature/54886

Obviously not. The fact is, the anti-malware industry is driven by user ignorance of technology. To make money, their key motivator is fear. => The general gist is: "If you don't buy our protection, you won't be safe!"

What they tend not to realise is this: Due to the higher learning curve in Linux, people aren't as gullible to this nonsense. Its because we have gained knowledge from that technology. We know how to use it.

Knowledge kills fear. If the world knew how to properly use their computers, companies like Kaspersky Labs would be out of business.

Keep FUD'ding Kaspersky! I expect to see you next year! Big Grin

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