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OpenOffice.org 2.0: An Office Suite With No Horizons

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OOo

Mad Penguin™ is running the third of three interviews with some of the people who have been hunkered down in endless meetings or hunched over their keyboards to bring us such a splendid, robust, virus-free code base. Today's interview is with OOo community manager, Louis Suarez-Potts. His interview is lengthy, but rich in history and deserving of its length, especially on this momentous occasion. OOo is a massive project, and so it is fitting to have an in-depth interview with one of OpenOffice.org's main project leads to look at where OOo has come from, how it got here, and where it is going.

Louis covers many topics in this article, but really only talks about one theme: the rewarding and sometimes tempestuous collaboration that we call free open source community. He discusses the unanticipated, wild success that OpenOffice.org became, and he alludes to some of the disappointments and frustrations that are inevitably part of working with human beings. He discusses the tensions that are inherent in strong-willed individuals who believe that they are working together while often actually going their own way; the logistic and cultural problems inherent in the OpenOffice.org community's attempts to merely coordinate its own massive, multi-cultural, multi-linguistic bulk; and how OOo has addressed those issues in the past.

Ultimately, Louis returns to the theme that many GNUsters and Penguinistas love most about free open source software: it's limitless possibilities.

Full Interview.

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