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HP revs netbooks: Attempts custom Linux OS

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Linux
Hardware

Hewlett Packard on Wednesday rolled out a netbook lineup designed to play catch up with Dell, Asus and others. But the real interesting play here is HP’s move to develop a custom Linux operating system for one of its netbooks.

HP is rolling out three netbooks powered by Intel’s Atom processor. Given that netbooks are accounting for most of the growth in PC units HP would be foolish not to dive in.

And the HP Mini 1000 with MIE (mobile Internet experience): This one comes with an HP interface that’s built on Linux and is designed for digital content–videos, music and video. It also comes with Skype, instant messaging and a dashboard to get to email and browsing. The MIE will start at $379 with availability in January.

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HP Mini 1000 review round-up

We were certainly suitably impressed by HP's new Mini 1000 netbook when we got our hands on it earlier this week, and it looks like that may be the common sentiment about the device, at least if this first batch of reviews is any indication. Like us, other folks were especially impressed by the netbook's keyboard, with Computer Shopper, Laptop Magazine, and PC World each singling it out as one of the stand-out features, and CNET going so far as to declare it "the best netbook keyboard" they've seen.

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