Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

AOL Goes Open Source

The most old-school Web media brand is set to embrace an open source, Web 2.0 approach in a major way.

AOL -- previously famous for its 'walled garden' philosophy aimed at keeping visitors within the portal's confines using AOL-only tools -- is slated to unveil a redesigned home page today that allows users to integrate various social networking profiles on AOL.com.

Officials said that on the new version of the site, users would be able to access information from their Facebook, MySpace, Bebo and Twitter accounts all in one place. They'll also be able to post status updates and upload content to their various profiles without having to leave AOL.

More Here

Also: AOL.com opens its home page, but does anyone care?




Term Abuse

It's nothing to do with open source. AOL should be ashamed of itself for misusing and diluting terms that used to mean something.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Lubuntu 15.04 Beta 2 Is Not Using Systemd, Nor LXQt - Screenshot Tour

Lubuntu 15.04 is the last in our screenshot tour articles related to the Final Beta a.k.a. Beta 2 of the Vivid Vervet development cycle. Lubuntu 15.04 Beta 2 offers one of the most lightweight desktop experiences and it is now powered by Ubuntu 15.04’s Linux 3.19.2 kernel. Read more Also: Xubuntu 15.04 Beta 2 Released, Offers a Neat Xfce 4.12 Experience - Screenshot Tour

What is keeping you from switching to Linux?

I'd like to make time for switching my main system but it is not there yet. What I plan to do is however use Linux on my laptop and get used to it this way. While it will take longer than a radical switch, it is the best I can do right now. Eventually though, I'd like to run all but one system on Linux and not Windows. Read more Also: Who’s Using, And Not Using, GNU/Linux Desktops

5 Surprising Reasons Behind The GNOME Resurgence

When the team behind GNOME came out with GNOME 3, which included the infamous GNOME Shell, the most popular desktop environment of the time saw a sharp decrease in users. And honestly, that trend is pretty easy to explain. When GNOME 3 initially came out, it was incomplete, buggy, and foreign. The concepts behind GNOME Shell were never before seen on a desktop system, and lots of users who were used to panels/taskbars and menus didn’t like the rather dramatic changes. Read more