Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

The strange decline of computer worms

Filed under
Security

Although windows-centric, theregister has published an article on the lessening numbers of "Slammer-style worms". They attribute this decline to "the widespread use of XP SP2 and greater use of personal firewall" rendering "worms far less potent in the same way that boot sector viruses died out with Windows 95 and the introduction of Office 2000 made macro viruses far less common."

"Whilst standard computer worms have experienced a relative decline, email worms have remained a problem and instant message security threats are becoming a greater concern. "A worm that exploited an IM vulnerability to spread could spread very quickly and travel straight through firewalls," Mikko Hyppönen, director of anti-virus research at F-Secure, warned. Spyware, Trojans and other types of software that turn PCs into zombie drones in botnets, and the increased sophistication of viruses capable of infecting mobile phones also remain key security concerns."

Full story.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS

Ubuntu 16.04 Review: What’s New for Desktop Users

Ubuntu is a tricky distribution. As much as I love it on my home server, my desktop is a different ballgame. In my experience, releases between LTS versions have many new technologies that may or may not survive in the next LTS. There were many technologies or features that Canonical thought were ambitious -- HUD, experimenting with menus, online dash search, Ubuntu Software Center, etc. -- but they were abandoned. So, if I were to use Ubuntu on my desktop, I would still choose LTS. Read more

Workflow and efficiency geek talks Drush and Drupal

I started using Drupal because I needed an open source content management system (CMS) to use in several community projects. One of the projects I was involved with was just getting started and had narrowed its CMS selection down to either Drupal or Joomla. At the time I was using a different framework, but I had considered Drupal in the past and knew that I liked it a lot better than Joomla. I convinced them to go with the new Drupal 6 release and converted all of my other projects for consistency. I started working with Drush because I wanted a unified mechanism to work with local and remote sites. My first major contribution to Drush was site aliases and sql-sync in Drush 3. Read more