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Review: Ubuntu 5.10 "Breezy Badger"

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In the short time that I've spent using Ubuntu 5.10 (Breezy Badger), I've really come to like it. The installation was painless, all my hardware was detected and configured correctly, package management was easy, and the clean-cut GNOME desktop is terrific.

I first came across Ubuntu when I reviewed version 5.04 (Hoary Hedgehog) earlier this year. I was pleased with its easy installation process, clean GNOME desktop, and great package management features. Now a new Ubuntu release is out, version 5.10 (Breezy Badger), and we're going to take it for a spin to see if it holds up to the reputation for stability and ease of use that we've come to expect.

Ubuntu follows a six-month release cycle, with each new release being only slightly different than the previous. Which is great for users because this minimizes the potential for unpleasant surprises in new versions. Ubuntu 5.10 builds on the stability of 5.04, and packs in the latest Linux desktop software. This includes GNOME 2.12.1 (desktop), Firefox 1.0.7 (web browser), Evolution 2.4.0 (email client), GAIM 1.5.0 (instant messaging), OpenOffice.org 2.0 beta 1.9.129 (office suite), GIMP 2.2.8 (image manipulation), and X.org 6.8.2. Numerous improvements include better laptop suspend/resume support, a polished graphical bootup process, easier application installation, better multi-language support, and simpler dual-boot configuration.

Installation

Full Review.

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