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"Kid Computers"

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Halloween night is now the official time of the year I start my Christmas shopping. Having seen a really cool toy on TV I thought my youngest nephew would like I went to my local Toys "R" Us and began to search the store. When I found no sign of the object of my attention it was time to look a bit for me. Even a 38 year old uncle likes toys.

So I went into the electronics section and asked about Wii availability. Then a nutty idea came to me, in a toy store yes, I asked, about "sub notebooks". The guy said that we didn't have anything except "kid computers" I looked over in the direction he was pointing and saw the "Eee" display. "Kid computers", I thought? Happy to see them I noticed the white Eee701 was Windows XP and with no flag logo I assumed (and the sales guy told me I was right) that the black Eee701 was Linux. What a great surprise to actually see the Eee701 in an electronics section of a toy store. But all they had were 701s and my paws won't handle a 701 with any great comfort. So I told the sales guy I was looking for a 1000 and thank him for his time.

The drive to my next destination that evening was occupied with the phrase "kid computers," in a tone reminiscent of Colin Baker's version of the Doctor in an "are you that stupid not to know this" attitude?

Rest Here




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