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Q&A: Which Linux OS is best?

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Linux

Recently, I have decided to ditch Windows and move to an open source (Linux) operating system, especially now that the software available for open source covers my needs. However, before taking the leap, I would like to ask a few questions.

Following some web research, I came to realise that the number of open source OSs available is mind-boggling. Not being a programmer and having been brainwashed by the ease of use that is Windows, I would like an OS that is similar and does not require the use of command lines.

I have read (in Database) that Open Office can read and use files created in Microsoft Office. It is doubtful that the opposite is true, but...

I worry about my attached peripherals. Yesterday, I went looking for a DVD-RW and every single one available was "designed for use with Windows".

Full Article.

I know which one is the best!

The one that works with all of your hardware, has an accepting community and a good selection of quality software!

You have no idea...

The person that just answered you in what seemed to be a non-commital way is the author of the easiest yet one of the most powerful Linux systems in existance. Look, we all have our preferences but since you have no frame of reference, I would highly recommend PCLinuxOS. Texstar has put his soul into the development of this distro and he did it for one reason.

You.

Being a new Linux user, you have too much to do to worry about configuring and tweaking things that should already work. With many distros, thats exactly what you must do. With PCLinuxOS, you install it and it just works. Yes, there will be some things you will need to learn, but you were not born with some cosmic consciousness about MS Windows. You had to learn that too. Go to www.pclinuxonline.com and find the download section. Not only is the distro the best, the community is the most helpful of them all. Just make sure to stay in touch with them and make sure to let them know if you contract a life threatening illness or anything. A few of them tend to jump to conclusions if they don't hear from you after a while.

helios

pclos = Hotel California

You can check out anytime you want but you can never leave!

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