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klik: True click-and-run software

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Software

Debian's APT makes installing software a breeze: you just run apt-get update&&apt-get upgrade to download and install the latest versions of all your software, or apt-get install widget to install widget on your machine. Pretty easy and painless. But now there's something available that's even easier and more painless: klik.

APT is cool, but it still has a few limitations, as do all other software install methods on Linux. klik attempts to resolve all of these issues.

Press OK whenever you're prompted to during the install, and soon you'll be ready to go. Konqueror will open to the klik home page, and you can start installing software the" klik and easy" way.

For instance, what if you want to try the latest beta of OpenOffice.org 2.0 (OOo), but you don't want to mess with actually installing it on your system? Just find the link to the klik package at http://klik.atekon.de (it's currently on the home page), click on it, and soon (depending on your connection speed), OOo beta will open and run on your system.

Full Article.

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