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How Ubuntu Lost Its Credibility and the Road to Regaining It

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If Ubuntu announced that a radically new theme would be included in Ubuntu 9.04, would you believe them? After promising exactly that in 8.04 and again in 8.10 without ever delivering, I would not. What if they promised to ship a perfectly stable and bug-free release for the next LTS? I might sort of believe it, but I would be skeptical, after what happened with Hardy Heron. What if they told you the next release would be so exciting you would have to upgrade the second it came out? Once again, I would be skeptical. The thing is, I still use Ubuntu on my computer with absolutly no intention of switching. So why am I so skeptical of Ubuntu’s ability to do anything? Four words: over promise, under deliver.

I admit that Ubuntu is in a really difficult situation. Being under the level of scrutiny that Ubuntu is under and not getting some negative press would be almost impossible.

Rest Here

fix the bugs

The reason I left the *buntu fold, which I am remineded of every few weeks, is that the bugs were never fixed on a timely basis. I still get emails about bug reports from two years ago that the devs are just now looking at; when i tell them I am no longer on Kubuntu they close the bug like it never existed or wasn't an issue.

Their treatment of KDE was poor, and the upgrades of Kubuntu from one release to the next also worked horribly, so that was another reason to leave the *buntus behind, for me.

Will I return? I kinda doubt it; Debian is too nice to me.


Before someone flames srlinuxx

re: link


it was there, you just couldn't see it. Big Grin

a missing ">"

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