Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Why I Choose CentOS for a Server

Filed under
Linux

There are many options available for Linux distros, over 500. Most of them you can make into a server. Basically, a server is a computer that provides services for other computers, like a web site, or DHCP or ftp download, etc. So it does not take much for a computer to act as a server. However, if you are looking for the professional level server that, in my opinion, leads all other distros in functioning as a server then you need to investigate CentOS. Here is a list of the reasons that CentOS is top on my list for a server.

Each distribution has its own philosophy, for CentOS (here you must always assume the origin of Red Hat), the requirement is for an operating system that is stable. Stability means providing an operating system that does not have bugs in the software. In order to eliminate bugs in software you need to use code that you can modify, in other words Open Source code. Using only Open Source code will not provide you with the opportunity to use the latest and greatest hardware as drivers may not be available for it. This can be frustrating when you know that there are drivers available but they are not installed because they cannot be modified. For me I can accept this as I want stability more than anything else. The second aspect of stability is that code must be tested over an extended period of time. This results in drivers being available at a later date that what other distros provide. This however, is the cost of stability.

Security

Have you put a server online lately?

More Here




More in Tux Machines

GNOME 3.26 "Manchester" Desktop Environment Slated for Release on September 13

The GNOME Project published today the preliminary release schedule for the next major version of the popular GNOME desktop environment, GNOME 3.26, whose development will start very soon. Read more Also: GNOME 3.26 Release Schedule Published

SUSE Linux Enterprise High Availability Extension

Historically, data replication has been available only piecemeal through proprietary vendors. In a quest to remediate history, SUSE and partner LINBIT announced a solution that promises to change the economics of data replication. The two companies' collaborative effort is the headliner in the updated SUSE Linux Enterprise High Availability Extension, which now includes LINBIT's integrated geo-clustering technology. Read more

Tizen and Android

Open source is mission critical for Europe’s air traffic

It is entirely possible to use open source in a highly regulated environment such as air traffic control, says Dr Gerolf Ziegenhain, Head of Linux Competence & Service Centre (LCSC) in Mainz (Germany). Open source service providers can shield an organisation from the wide variety of development processes in the open source community. Read more