Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

$5m daily fine beckons for bad boy Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft
Legal

Although the European Commission's statements are diplomatic to the point of opacity, there's no mistaking what it thinks of the latest turn in the Microsoft antitrust saga. The Commission doesn't think Microsoft's trying hard enough, and it has canvassed widespread industry support to bolster its position. From a Microsoft document unearthed by ZDNet, and still available here [PDF 450kb], we can see why even long time Redmond partners are losing their patience.

Microsoft's answer to its punishment is typical: seeing it as an opportunity for a new revenue stream. It has a precedent: Microsoft's proposal to individual States, including California, would be an in-kind donation of PCs to schools, for which Microsoft could later collect royalties. Let's see how it's gone about charging for its punishment in Europe.

Suppose you create network software or hardware that needs to talk to a Microsoft file system. It could be a printer, of a storage device, or a piece of middleware. As a licensee you must agree to pay Microsoft $50,000 up front in Prepaid Royalties. Then depending on the number of users your product has, you pay on a per user basis depending on what's accessed. For the 'Print and File Server' portion you pay on a user basis up to $1900, but no less than $80 per server. For workgroup access (Domain Controllers command a higher royalty) you pay up to $600, but no less than $100 per server.

You'll need to keep accurate records, for Redmond auditor's can drop in at 14 days' notice. Failure to satisfy Microsoft auditors risks a fine of 5 per cent of the royalties, or $50,000 - or whichever is higher.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Living The Linux Laptop Lifestyle

Another great advantage of open source software: you can run it off of a flash drive before installing it. And I have to admit that I loved Linux Lite's out-of-the-box feel, so much so that I reconsidered installing my number two selection: LXLE, which is designed for underpowered older machines. According to a label on the bottom of my Toughbook, this pre-Linux laptop was decommissioned in 2005, making it well over ten years old. And so I replaced the RAM, installed Linux Lite, and after a short period, I was back to living a Linux laptop lifestyle while waiting for my charger. Read more

Mentor Embedded Linux gains cloud-based IoT platform

Mentor announced a “Mentor Embedded IoT Framework” platform that builds on top of Mentor Embedded Linux with cloud-based IoT cloud services ranging from device authentication and provisioning to monitoring and diagnostics. Mentor’s Mentor Embedded IoT Framework (MEIF) extends its Yocto Project based Mentor Embedded Linux (MEL) and Nucleus RTOS development platforms to provide cloud services for IoT device management. The platform mediates between these platforms and cloud service backends, including Amazon Web Services (AWS), Eclipse IoT, Microsoft Azure, and Siemens MindSphere. Read more

Bang & Olufsen’s RPi add-on brings digital life to old speakers

B&O and HiFiBerry have launched an open source, DIY “Beocreate 4” add-on for the Raspberry Pi that turns vintage speakers into digitally amplified, wireless-enabled smart speakers with the help of a 180-Watt 4-channel amplifier, a DSP, and a DAC. Bang & Olufsen has collaborated with HiFiBerry to create the open source, $189 Beocreate 4 channel amplifier kit. The 180 x 140 x 30mm DSP/DAC/amplifier board pairs with your BYO Raspberry Pi 3 with a goal of upcycling vintage passive speakers. Read more