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Why Software Suites Suck

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Software

With the release of StarOffice 8 and OpenOffice.org, and the rumors about MS Office 12, office suites are making their rounds in the press again. Microsoft's office suite is certainly the most popular on Windows, but there are competing suites from Corel and IBM. On GNU/Linux we have KOffice, GNOME Office, OpenOffice.org, StarOffice, and SoftMaker's nascent office package. But no matter if they are free or proprietary, expensive or cheap, and regardless of what platforms they run on, the one thing that all software suites have in common is that they suck.

Full Story.

less training in suites

I am a writer, artist, philosopher, and web designer and I use Writer and find it very useful. I don't have a problem with it being a Word clone, if it brings more people to it. As long as Microsoft has contributed no code and it doesn't run VBA macros (viruses) I don't mind if it looks like a Microsoft product. What I don't like about Microsoft products is that they can destroy data and can't produce anything of quality and the amount of features that don't work as advertised. I think a word processor makes it easy for people who want to do light formatting which is what most people writing on the computer want from their software. It is true that Scribus provides better quality publications when it comes to graphics and I only draw with Inkscape or Gimp, but if Draw improves the quality of their graphics engine and has the right features and is stable enough I would use it for drawing too. It simplifies things a lot when you have fewer applications to have to master and the same look and feel crosses several applications as in an office suite. When I see an option in one part of a suite I know it will do the same thing in the other part of the suite. It doesn't mean that their isn't a market for specilized word processors for writers. For that, their are many on Mac OS X that are targeted that way for those that have those kind of requirements.

Don't agree

Complaining that Office Suites are too complex is a feeble argument at best. It's like complaining that the office elevator has 30 button's and you only use two - therefore the elevator is hopelessly too complex for you to use. Use what you need, ignore (or customize the toolbar) the rest. Feature sets in an application are always going to be a compromise, and people will continue to whine no matter what (it's either to complex or to simplistic for their taste).

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