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Fedora 10 joins Ubuntu 8.10 in not using "xorg.conf" by default

Apparently, using xrandr to automagically configure X (at least its driver/resolution/bit depth settings), without creating an "xorg.conf" configuration file, is the wave of the future.

With my old NVIDIA GeForce 6200 video card and 1280x1024 LCD monitor, however, it doesn't work well - all I get is 800x600 resolution by default as the highest resolution available, in both distros.

It might be interesting to see if one could configure xrandr to get 1280x1024 resolution without creating an xorg.conf.

Oddly, using the command "dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xorg" in Ubuntu only takes you through configuring the keyboard and mouse settings, not the driver/resolution/bit depth settings. Installing the proprietary NVIDIA driver forces the creation of an xorg.conf.

In Fedora, you can install and run the GUI "system-config-display" applet, which will create an xorg.conf to your specifications. (The applet apparently doesn't come installed by default. At least, it's not on the live CD.)

Or you can use the command (as root) "Xorg -configure :1" (if X is running) or "Xorg -configure" (if X isn't running), which will write a skeleton "xorg.conf.new" to the current directory, and then tweak it to your liking.

One wonders, how many people will have problems caused by this change, versus how many people won't even notice that it happened?

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