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Cruising Without a Bruising

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Linux Journal's \"Señor Editor\" recounts the latest Geek Cruise's visits to resorts later trashed by Hurricane Wilma.

Tales of woe by frequent travelers rarely earn sympathy--even from their own breed. But that doesn't stop them from telling their tales anyway: "The caviar in First was okay, but the toast was stale. And they wouldn't give me an aisle seat." Fortunately, I have no tales of travel woe to tell about the Linux Lunacy Geek Cruise earlier this month. Quite the opposite, in fact. But I won't tell those either. Not yet, anyway. Because there's real suffering in the news, much of it in the places we just visited.

Cruising the Caribbean during hurricane season is a bit like dodging slow-moving Frisbees, each one being 300 miles across. Ships can do the dodging, but land can't. That was one of the biggest lessons--about Linux, as well as other natural developments--that I'm still learning right now.

See, as I'm writing this, Hurricane Wilma is wrapping up her own tour of south Florida, the latest stop in her itinerary. Before that it was the northeast Yucatan peninsula, where she paused for several days, destroying much of Cancun, Cozumel and the surrounding resort region with Category 4 winds.

Two weeks earlier, I had been sitting in an Internet cafe on Cozumel, enjoying the first cheap and fast broadband of the cruise, wrapping up my column for the January issue of Linux Journal. It was a convivial experience.

Full Article.

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