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Free Remote KDE Desktops

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KDE

CosmoPOD.com offers free remote KDE desktops over NX. Anyone can sign up to have their own desktop accessible from any computer with a network connection. CosmoPOP uses KDE's Kiosk framework to ensure security for their system. To find out more about the service and why KDE was the chosen desktop, KDE Dot News spoke to the man behind CosmoPOD, Stephen Ensor. Read on for the interview.

What services does cosmopod.com offer?

CosmoPOD.com is a personal online desktop that offers 1GB of online storage, one may run CosmoPOD.com on any computer that is connected to the internet and may do all the common tasks a modern desktop has to offer.

Full Story.

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