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Web 2.0 Cracks Start to Show

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Spam, scams and scatterbrains -- the same problems that plagued the old internet are cropping up again in a new wave of technologies known collectively as Web 2.0.

But this time around, proponents say Web 2.0 has been better engineered to withstand the troubles that wrecked Usenet, BBSes and free e-mail.

The cycle is so predictable, it's almost a natural law: Every new internet movement popular enough to generate buzz also generates a backlash.

This time, the debate revolves around the cracks that are starting to appear in Web 2.0, a term coined by O'Reilly Media Vice President Dale Dougherty to describe a post-dot-com generation of sites and services that use the web as a platform -- things like Flickr, BitTorrent, tagging and RSS syndication.

While there's no strict agreement on exactly what Web 2.0 is, much of it involves public participation and contributions from the commons.

Web 2.0 is very open, but all that openness has its downside: When you invite the whole world to your party, inevitably someone pees in the beer.

Full Story.

duh!

the same problems that plagued the old internet are cropping up again

Of course they are, since the only thing that is new about Web 2 is the new buzzword. The technologies and concepts it uses are actually the same ones that power the web today - how could it not have the same problems?

much of it involves public participation and contributions from the commons.
Those of us blessed with memory retention better than goldfish still remember that was exactly the idea behind the web 0.1 - the first and some would say, the best one - the one we had before big business, governments and idiots spouting marketing babble like "web 2" jumped on the bandwagon.

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