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OpenOffice skakes Microsoft

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OOo

IF THERE'S one thing in life that gives Steve Ballmer, Microsoft's abrasive chief executive, the shivers it's probably the existence of an outfit called OpenOffice.org.

OpenOffice is an open-source software outfit responsible for a bundle of productivity software that competes with the Seattle company's great cash cow, Microsoft Office.

It does almost everything MS Office does but, unlike the Microsoft product, it's free.

No cash upfront, no licensing fees, no advertising support: absolutely, totally buckshee.

A team of open-source devotees gives time to keeping OpenOffice up to date and Sun Microsystems, a business computing company with little love for Microsoft, helps to bankroll their efforts.
In October they launched the latest version of OpenOffice, version 3.0. A few weeks later they added, for the first time, a version for the Apple Mac.

OpenOffice now runs happily on Windows, Linux, Mac OS and Sun Solaris machines, and in just about every language.

Here at Doubleclick we've been using OpenOffice 3.0 for some weeks and we must say it's getting harder and harder to see why average users would want to shell out several hundred dollars for MS Office.

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