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Linux - Stop holding our kids back

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Linux

This blog is momentarily interrupted to bring you a snippet of recently received email.


"...observed one of my students with a group of other children gathered around his laptop. Upon looking at his computer, I saw he was giving a demonstration of some sort. The student was showing the ability of the laptop and handing out Linux disks. After confiscating the disks I called a confrence with the student and that is how I came to discover you and your organization. Mr. Starks, I am sure you strongly believe in what you are doing but I cannot either support your efforts or allow them to happen in my classroom. At this point, I am not sure what you are doing is legal. No software is free and spreading that misconception is harmful. These children look up to adults for guidance and discipline. I will research this as time allows and I want to assure you, if you are doing anything illegal, I will pursue charges as the law allows. Mr. Starks, I along with many others tried Linux during college and I assure you, the claims you make are grossly over-stated and hinge on falsehoods.

Hmmmm....

I suppose I should, before anything else, thank you. You have given me the opportunity to show others just what a battle we face in what we do.

Rest Here



re: Stop holding our kids back

Boy, this story has been linked to and discussed everywhere this week! I knew it was a wild story when I read it, but I never dreamed it'd be the big news it turned out to be.

Helios has posted Follow-up stating, "It never was my intention to attack anyone personally....

My sights were set on correcting some obvious misconceptions. It was a focused attack on ignorance but with some unsolicited commentary on a particular group."

Included is a subsequent conversation with teacher in question.

Fiction

Remember back in the good old days when journalism actually meant CHECKING UP ON THE FACTS.

Now days with the internet and bloggers, any story, ANY STORY, can get published and NO WHERE up or down the food chain are the facts verified.

Keep in mind kiddies - this is the same drooling fanboy that did the whole Linux Sponsored Race Car fiasco - and remember how the facts were "adjusted" to fit the story several times during that little fantasy.

Hey Karen, welcome to (hell control W) the community.

cookingwithlinux.com: So, after listening to people gripe about this story today, and yesterday, on IRC in email, on various blogs, where Mr Starks was talking about an email he received, I got to thinking. Just to give you context if you don't know what I am on about, click here.

People around planet Earth are chatting about this story, online, in blogs, IRC, even over at UDS I heard it mentioned.

Firstly, is it really a story? I don't think so.

Just not convinced

kmandla.wordpress: So what, you say? So … what proof have you seen that the e-mail acutally happened? Or for that matter, the follow-up phone call? I’ve been a secondary school teacher, and believe you me, most teachers don’t have enough spare time to dash off e-mails threatening legal action. Schools have other ways of dealing with quasi-legal issues.

But beyond that, it’s just a little too convenient. There’s a surprising level of misinformation in the e-mail, presenting a level of ignorance that is almost comical. And the turnaround — or “conversion,” to use a theological term, since the tone of responses smacks of zealotry — takes place within days of the original event. Now the teacher is supposedly having Linux installed on a machine, if I understand it right. Again, how convenient. No identity? A tearful, unsubstantiated phone call? There’s just too much that happens too easily, and all of it makes the author look like a Linux hero.

Rest Here

re: Just not convinced

Did I miss the memo that I got a new ghost writer? That guy stole my entire rant (including the bullet points).

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