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Linux Developer Ready for Scrutiny

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Linux

Red Hat has submitted its upcoming release of Enterprise Linux Security for the Defense Department's Common Criteria Evaluation and Validation Scheme, seeking a government imprimatur that could strengthen the company's hold on the federal market.

IBM and Trusted Computer Solutions, two longtime Red Hat partners, are also involved. During the evaluation, the operating system will run on IBM servers using a variety of processors, and TCS has already released software that incorporates the enhancements to Red Hat's Enterprise Linux 5.

"Red Hat's more popular in North America," Adelstein said. "IBM's able to sell it. They're using it almost exclusively. All the [IBM] Tivoli software runs on Red Hat."

The new certification and IBM's allegiance will only widen the gap between the Linux vendors, he said.

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