Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Beranger Defects to Windows as a rational act

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

In a world with too many irrational religions, who needs another one, called... Linux on the desktop? Red Hat doesn't believe in it, so why should I?

This is to certify that I have migrated my home laptops to Windows XP Professional for a week already.

Since Aug. 15, 2005, this blog used to include a good deal of Linux coverage (especially the so-called “old blog”, whose graphical look changed several times), and the very few faithful readers should know quite a lot about my tumultuous love-hate relationship with the bloody penguin.

Officially registered with the Linux Counter on Aug. 26, 1996 at #37.497, my attitude towards Linux was not constant over time, with a lowered interest between 1998 and 2004. Since 2004, I tried to trust Linux more than before, and to exclusively use it on my home PC and old laptop — then on the new laptop too.

Years later, I know that it was a total waste of time. “Linux on the desktop” is a dead horse, and those who killed it are precisely Red Hat Inc., Canonical Ltd., the stupidity of the project management of the major desktop environments (GNOME and KDE), and some structural errors.

More Here




Good for Beranger

I always wondered if Beranger was smart, or just a poser that sounded smart. Finally it looks like he's actually on the right side of the IQ bell curve (although it sure did take a long time to reach a foregone conclusion). Good job Beranger - welcome to the real world where time is money and the cost of productivity WAY out weighs the so called savings of "free" software.

Irony or Hypocrisy?

For someone asserting that Linux (and "free" (sic) software) represents lost time, money, and productivity, you sure do waste a lot of time (ergo, by your logic, money and productivity cost) on a *Linux* specific news blog.

And for the record, I spend *far* more time helping to resolve other people's Windows-specific computer issues than I do dealing with any of my own Linux issues - and I'm no expert. I made the change cold-turkey a little over a year ago, and have seen no loss of time, money, or productivity.

I think he makes a good

I think he makes a good point in what he is saying. I have been using Linux for about 8 years and to me it has gotten worse. Yes it is easier to use now but does it work better? Things like the switch to KDE4 and Compiz being included in distros are some of the worst decisions ever. Also the point about the major division and us vs them attitude is what is killing Linux for a lot of people. I look at Distrowatch and see 900 billion distros and wonder how good they could be if they got togeather and put their time and effort into making one really good distro.

For example the so-called worst os ever Vista works better than any distro with KDE4 on it. I loved KDE3 but KDE4 is terrible and it has been a year since it was released!

Right

weow wrote:
I look at Distrowatch and see 900 billion distros and wonder how good they could be if they got togeather and put their time and effort into making one really good distro.

Exactly (although just one might narrow the options down a tad to much).

Most "Distro's" aren't made by real code monkeys, they're all a bunch of closet graphic designers that think they can make "their" Linux LOOK better instead of worrying about making it WORK better.

Repackaging Upstream bugs and slapping a new coat of paint on them does not a Distro make.

Beranger

You gotta understand--Beranger gets this way about monthly--it's what makes reading his strongly opinionated blog so interesting--and well worth it!.

"Manopause" anyone? Wink

regards,
-dc

While true it doesnt make

While true it doesnt make what he says any less true.

re: true

while [ 1 ]
do
echo "Huh?"
sleep 1
done

Beranger's move to Xp

Good for him. I am a Linux user and will continue to use Linux as it is perfect for all my daily tasks.

Having said that, I agree with most of what the guy has said, so fair play for making the right choice for him.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Open source is in our DNA

The same thing that compels us to make Linux (and many other projects) free and open source is present in many of humanity's greatest achievements Read more

Debian Is Dropping Support for VLC Media Player, Mediawiki for Wheezy LTS

The Debian Long Term Support (LTS) developers have announced that they are dropping support for certain packages as part of the extended life cycle for the Debian GNU/Linux 7 "Wheezy" operating system. Read more

Hands on: What's new and noteworthy with Android N

With Google's I/O developers' conference behind us, it's time to start looking forward to what's next in the world of Android. The most prominent thing is Google's rapidly approaching Android release, currently known only as Android "N." (The company has yet to reveal the full name or version number.) While the software itself isn't expected to arrive until sometime this summer, we're getting an increasingly clear picture of the fresh features and improvements it'll provide. Read more

today's leftovers

  • FLOSS Weekly 389: Best Practices Badge
  • OpenGL 4.5 For The Intel Mesa Driver May Be Imminent
    Intel has been rapidly advancing their OpenGL 4.x support and OpenGL 4.5 is even in sight now. Kristian Høgsberg today landed GL_KHR_robustness support in the i965 DRI driver, a requirement for OpenGL 4.5.
  • Shotwell vs. digiKam
    How to manage your photos? – That is probably the biggest question for anyone doing anything with a photo camera. As resolutions of cameras grow, the data we have to manage is growing ever. In my case I am talking about more than 50000 photos and videos measuring up to about 200Gb of disk space, constantly growing. There are several photo management softwares out there, I guess the most commonly used ones are Shotwell for the Gnome desktop, digiKam for the KDE world, and FotoXX. I have not used Shotwell and digiKam for quite some time, and collect here my experiences of strength and weaknesses of the two programs. FotoXX seems to be very powerful, too, but I haven’t tested it till now.
  • Tweet your database with db2twitter
    db2twitter is developed by and run for LinuxJobs.fr, the job board of th french-speaking Free Software and Opensource community.
  • Tiny Core Linux 7.1 Screenshot Tour
  • Annoying myths about Linux that won't go away
    Linux has been around for many years, and has gotten better and better as time has gone by. Yet there are some enduring, inaccurate, and annoying myths about Linux that persist to this day. A Linux redditor started a thread about Linux myths and got some interesting responses from his fellow Linux users:
  • GStreamer Spring Hackfest 2016
    After missing the last few GStreamer hackfests I finally managed to attend this time. It was held in Thessaloniki, Greece’s second largest city. The city is located by the sea side and the entire hackfest and related activities were either directly by the sea or just a couple blocks away.
  • My talk at OSDC 2016: Continuous Integration in Data Centers – Further 3 Years Later
  • Isenkram with PackageKit support - new version 0.23 available in Debian unstable
    The isenkram system is a user-focused solution in Debian for handling hardware related packages. The idea is to have a database of mappings between hardware and packages, and pop up a dialog suggesting for the user to install the packages to use a given hardware dongle. Some use cases are when you insert a Yubikey, it proposes to install the software needed to control it; when you insert a braille reader list it proposes to install the packages needed to send text to the reader; and when you insert a ColorHug screen calibrator it suggests to install the driver for it. The system work well, and even have a few command line tools to install firmware packages and packages for the hardware already in the machine (as opposed to hotpluggable hardware).