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Beranger Defects to Windows as a rational act

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

In a world with too many irrational religions, who needs another one, called... Linux on the desktop? Red Hat doesn't believe in it, so why should I?

This is to certify that I have migrated my home laptops to Windows XP Professional for a week already.

Since Aug. 15, 2005, this blog used to include a good deal of Linux coverage (especially the so-called “old blog”, whose graphical look changed several times), and the very few faithful readers should know quite a lot about my tumultuous love-hate relationship with the bloody penguin.

Officially registered with the Linux Counter on Aug. 26, 1996 at #37.497, my attitude towards Linux was not constant over time, with a lowered interest between 1998 and 2004. Since 2004, I tried to trust Linux more than before, and to exclusively use it on my home PC and old laptop — then on the new laptop too.

Years later, I know that it was a total waste of time. “Linux on the desktop” is a dead horse, and those who killed it are precisely Red Hat Inc., Canonical Ltd., the stupidity of the project management of the major desktop environments (GNOME and KDE), and some structural errors.

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Good for Beranger

I always wondered if Beranger was smart, or just a poser that sounded smart. Finally it looks like he's actually on the right side of the IQ bell curve (although it sure did take a long time to reach a foregone conclusion). Good job Beranger - welcome to the real world where time is money and the cost of productivity WAY out weighs the so called savings of "free" software.

Irony or Hypocrisy?

For someone asserting that Linux (and "free" (sic) software) represents lost time, money, and productivity, you sure do waste a lot of time (ergo, by your logic, money and productivity cost) on a *Linux* specific news blog.

And for the record, I spend *far* more time helping to resolve other people's Windows-specific computer issues than I do dealing with any of my own Linux issues - and I'm no expert. I made the change cold-turkey a little over a year ago, and have seen no loss of time, money, or productivity.

I think he makes a good

I think he makes a good point in what he is saying. I have been using Linux for about 8 years and to me it has gotten worse. Yes it is easier to use now but does it work better? Things like the switch to KDE4 and Compiz being included in distros are some of the worst decisions ever. Also the point about the major division and us vs them attitude is what is killing Linux for a lot of people. I look at Distrowatch and see 900 billion distros and wonder how good they could be if they got togeather and put their time and effort into making one really good distro.

For example the so-called worst os ever Vista works better than any distro with KDE4 on it. I loved KDE3 but KDE4 is terrible and it has been a year since it was released!

Right

weow wrote:
I look at Distrowatch and see 900 billion distros and wonder how good they could be if they got togeather and put their time and effort into making one really good distro.

Exactly (although just one might narrow the options down a tad to much).

Most "Distro's" aren't made by real code monkeys, they're all a bunch of closet graphic designers that think they can make "their" Linux LOOK better instead of worrying about making it WORK better.

Repackaging Upstream bugs and slapping a new coat of paint on them does not a Distro make.

Beranger

You gotta understand--Beranger gets this way about monthly--it's what makes reading his strongly opinionated blog so interesting--and well worth it!.

"Manopause" anyone? Wink

regards,
-dc

While true it doesnt make

While true it doesnt make what he says any less true.

re: true

while [ 1 ]
do
echo "Huh?"
sleep 1
done

Beranger's move to Xp

Good for him. I am a Linux user and will continue to use Linux as it is perfect for all my daily tasks.

Having said that, I agree with most of what the guy has said, so fair play for making the right choice for him.

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