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How about "just using" instead of "migrating"?

Filed under
Linux

Here we are again with a volley of imbeciles who can barely keep their shoes tied yet want to tell the world that Linux isn't getting "the job" done for them.

"But" they cry, " Linux doesn't save files the same way Windows does." Or " It doesn't 'click' the same ways Windows does."

It's about expectations.

If you walk up to a Linux desktop and expect it to be like Windows, you are going to have problems.

By the way, who in the world ever suggested that MS Windows should be the example that all other OS's should be measured against?

Tell you what, If you want to use Windows, be my guest, use it. If you want to use Linux, feel free, use that too.

However, don't get in a huff because you have some pre-established expectation that Linux should behave or look or whatever that whatever OS you're currently using does.

I can show you children who use Linux as a desktop and have no problems at all using it.

Children. You know, those little, less educated and supposedly less mature, people that wander around in our schools and homes.

"But, But, Linux is way too complicated and difficult to use and figure out." You can go sell that load of BS somewhere else. There are Linux machines installed to workstations that allow for accessing windows shares of win machines on the lan. They access the windows shared printers too.

The people type letters and use spreadsheets and edit documents and Oh My God!! They actually get their work done. On Linux machines!!!

The travesty of it all.

Quit being ninnies.

I have children between the ages of 4 and 9. Every single one of them actually prefers Linux. They play games and do homework on it. All the time, can you believe it? I'm waiting for Child Protective Services to come take them because I'm not making them use Windows, like all the other kids do. . I'm such a meanie.

My computer phobic wife, who needs encouragement just to open email, uses Linux. Oh the Horror!!!

She says "You know, I don't get the little warning pop ups and errors I used to see in the other one we used." Gee, imagine that.

Yes, I'm sure every Linux fan has similar examples they can make. The point is it is how they approached using Linux on the desktop.

They didn't come in with a pre-conceived notion about how it should look or do things. They sat down in front of it, I showed them the menu and how to do some basic things, then I left them alone, told them to play with it. There's nothing they can do to it that I can't fix. never have had to fix anything yet, over a year later. ( except the stupid things I do, playing around.)

When I do in-house training at the schools or small businesses I work with, I do the same thing. I tell them to forget the other machine they worked on. Just sit down and follow me through a few basics, then play with it. Ask me questions as they come to your mind. Almost every time, by the end of the training, they are good to go. no complaints, no whining, just off and running.

I encourage them. Use it, work with it, play with it. There's nothing you can do to it that I can't fix. Don't panic. That's the key.

Don't panic. Be relaxed. Approach it confidently. Instead of sitting down to it like it's a bomb that will go off, just relax. Use it.

There are lot's of things Linux is improving upon and as time goes on, it will improve more.

Believe it or not, Lot's of stuff needs improving in Windows too. It is also in a state of constant improvement. The point? there is NO perfect OS. None. Nil, Nyet, nein, nada. Get the point yet?

Keep an open mind, relax, set your pre-conceived notions away and enjoy learning and using what's in front of you.

In no time at all, we can have multi-talented persons instead of being an idiot on one Operating System, they can be idiots on two of them. Who knows.

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