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Mandriva Linux 2009 Spring Alpha 1 released

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The first pre-release of Mandriva Linux 2009 Spring is now available. This alpha concentrates on updating to the major desktop components of the distribution, including KDE 4.2 Beta 2, GNOME 2.25.2, Xfce 4.6 Beta 2, X.org server 1.5, and kernel 2.6.28 rc8. It is also the first distribution to introduce the major new Tcl/Tk release, 8.6. The alpha is available only in the DVD Free edition with a traditional installer and no proprietary applications; future pre-releases will add the live CD One edition with proprietary drivers. Please help test this first pre-release and report bugs to Mandriva.

AdamW4Mandriva

A job so good is one a person would do even for no pay. I hope you'll continue this next year.

Thanks, but..

I'm still being paid. My contract runs out Dec 31st.

Adam Williamson
Mandriva
Community manager | Newsletter editor | Bugmaster | Proofreader | Packager

Hope you'll continue when time permits

Yes, I know.

I hope you'll continue when time permits. I see promotion of FOSS also as an ethical obligation. Smile

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