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tuxmachines' move

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Well, the site is moved and except for a few niggles, all seems to be okay. The majority of the work was completed about 10 PM CST last night before the drinks.

The two niggles aggrevating me this morning are: I forgot to move the logs and stats stuff. So, if I can get them up is a big "I don't know." Best case scenario, I lose a days worth of traffic counts. More than likely I'll lose the whole months cuz webalizer is pickier than picky. Just about any messing with its files and it goes back to zero.

And the more important is that cron jobs aren't running. Cron is another picky thing in Linux. Most of the time they work and work good. But sometimes, they don't - and usually for no decernable reason. I'm still trying to figure that one out. I've had it happen to me a coupla times over the years and it's a toughie (for me anyway).

Oh, and third - we lost the search index. Now this should have been in the database and I can not fathom any reason why this went MIA. When things are working at their best, the site software only updates 3% per cron run. So under the best circumstances, it'd take about 36 hours to index my site. And with crons screwed up, it'll be longer. So use the google search in the side column for the next few days until I get the site re-indexed.

I was hoping the site might be a tad snappier on the new hardware, but I can't see it. I guess any performance boost is negated by my internet pipeline.

But all in all, it was a fairly smooth move. I even updated Drupal to the latest version in the 5.x branch. Let me know if you spot any issues.

Thanks,
Susan


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site move update

Well, the crons turned out to be simple fix, so that's good now. And as a result the site seach is re-indexing and should be squared away by tonight.

I have the stats back up and we only lost a few hours on the 23rd in-between time I tarred up the files and brought the new server online. ...I think. The numbers look fairly close to what they should be now.

I just have to reset-up backups and I think that's about it. I have to rewrite the scripts but I should finish that shortly.

Thanks for your patience and interest.

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