Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Obligatory Year-End Positive Linux Predictions

Filed under
Linux

Almost every year end, most blogs - magazines - publications and so called “Linux gurus” makes mostly positive predictions about the future of Linux and it’s market share. Following this tradition, it’s only fair that I too share with you my Linux predictions for 2009.

- Linux will NOT take over Window or even Mac OS consumer desktop market share…

- However, it will most definitely will increase its own market share. Perhaps, not as drastic as we would like to see but significant nevertheless - compare to previous years.

- Increase in Netbook sales will continue to serve Linux well to help gain market share. As more distributors concentrate on keeping netbook cheap in a highly competitive market where there is demand for cheap computers in a failing economy.

- Ubuntu will finally improve its default ugly theme.

Rest Here




re: killer apps

atang1 wrote:
Linux can be made more popular by using FSF(gnu) copyright to restrict apps only to Linux?

Well that would be a quick way to completely kill Linux - no apps means no need to use that OS.

Applications live or die by the survival of the fittest formula. In the commercial world - it happens quickly because no one want to dump money into developing a zombie app. In the OPEN SOURCE (bite me Stallman) world - craptastic apps linger on because the religious zealots always think that the next point point point release will be the one where the rest of the world becomes enlightened and realizes how fantastic all those bugs features are.

Like soup, having 9 billion flavours made by 15 billion chef's will not create the next food extravaganza.

Unorganized effort always creates mediocre results.

Except for the few "professional" projects - Open Source (bite me Stallman) will always pretty much suck because the project maintainers live they lives in blissful blinder-esque fashion and only listen to their fanboys and not to what the users are telling them they need.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Why open source could be IBM's key to future success in the cloud

Do those same developers need IBM? Developers certainly benefit from IBM's investments in open source, but it's not as clear that those same developers have much to gain from IBM's cloud. Google, for example, has done a stellar job open sourcing code like TensorFlow and Kubernetes that feeds naturally into running related workloads on Google Cloud Platform. Aside from touting its Java bonafides, however, IBM has yet to demonstrate that developers get significant benefits for modern workloads on its cloud. That's IBM's big challenge: Translating its open source expertise into real, differentiated value for developers on its cloud. Read more

Top 8 Debian-Based Distros

Most people tend to forget that despite Ubuntu's success over the years, it's still just a distro based on another distro - Debian. Debian on its own, however, isn't really well suited for newer users...hence the explosion of distros based on Debian over the recent years. There are lot of great choices for Linux users. Which one is best for you? Read more

Compact, rugged IoT gateway offers dual GbE with PoE

Inforce has launched a $250 “Inforce 6320” IoT gateway that runs Linux on a quad -A53 Snapdragon 410, and offers WiFi, BT, GPS, HDMI, USB, -30 to 85°C support, and dual GbE ports with PoE. Inforce Computing’s $250 Inforce 6320 is a compact (170 x 95 x 42mm) IoT gateway that runs Ubuntu Core (Snappy) and Debian on Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 410E. Inforce promises “periodic upstream kernel based BSP releases [that] include in-depth documentation along with a host of royalty-free software.” The Debian BSP includes LXDE, drivers for all available interfaces, as and access to the Inforce TechWeb tech support services. Read more

Today in Techrights