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Obligatory Year-End Positive Linux Predictions

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Linux

Almost every year end, most blogs - magazines - publications and so called “Linux gurus” makes mostly positive predictions about the future of Linux and it’s market share. Following this tradition, it’s only fair that I too share with you my Linux predictions for 2009.

- Linux will NOT take over Window or even Mac OS consumer desktop market share…

- However, it will most definitely will increase its own market share. Perhaps, not as drastic as we would like to see but significant nevertheless - compare to previous years.

- Increase in Netbook sales will continue to serve Linux well to help gain market share. As more distributors concentrate on keeping netbook cheap in a highly competitive market where there is demand for cheap computers in a failing economy.

- Ubuntu will finally improve its default ugly theme.

Rest Here




re: killer apps

atang1 wrote:
Linux can be made more popular by using FSF(gnu) copyright to restrict apps only to Linux?

Well that would be a quick way to completely kill Linux - no apps means no need to use that OS.

Applications live or die by the survival of the fittest formula. In the commercial world - it happens quickly because no one want to dump money into developing a zombie app. In the OPEN SOURCE (bite me Stallman) world - craptastic apps linger on because the religious zealots always think that the next point point point release will be the one where the rest of the world becomes enlightened and realizes how fantastic all those bugs features are.

Like soup, having 9 billion flavours made by 15 billion chef's will not create the next food extravaganza.

Unorganized effort always creates mediocre results.

Except for the few "professional" projects - Open Source (bite me Stallman) will always pretty much suck because the project maintainers live they lives in blissful blinder-esque fashion and only listen to their fanboys and not to what the users are telling them they need.

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