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A Computer Genius, His Russian Bride, The KGB, Intrigue And Murder

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Reiser

In his interview, Reiser maintains that the murder was justified because he was convinced that Nina suffered from a psychological disorder and that she was harming his children. "I don't think that people who hurt children should die, but I think that children should be safe," Reiser says. But prosecutors deny Nina was suffering from any psychological condition that would cause her to harm her kids.

"Hans and I were like brothers. [What] I hate about all this is that I came to know my brother and my brother isn’t who I thought he was," says Sean Sturgeon in an exclusive interview with 48 Hours Mystery.

Sturgeon is talking about his best friend, computer genius Hans Reiser, who was responsible for some of the most important software developments in the last 15 years and counted the U.S. Department of Defense among his clients. Reiser married Nina, a successful doctor, after her photo in a Russian bride magazine caught his eye.

But as the marriage began to fall apart, Nina began an affair with Sturgeon, and the couple was soon embroiled in a bitter divorce. In 2006, Nina vanished after dropping off their children at Reiser’s house.

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(Intro plagiarized from here)




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