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Revolution OS: A Review

Filed under
Linux
Movies

Went by the library today and picked up a few Linux newb books (no LINUX FOR DUMMIES, I WAS SADDENED). So I’ll be reading that. In the meantime, here’s a review for a documentary about Linux I just got my hands on, relatively speaking. The documentary: REVOLUTION OS.

So, what can I say about this flick other than I’ve watched it twice now and it seems like it’d be a pretty good documentary for someone (like yours truly) dipping his toe into the wide wide world of Linux. It’s somewhat of a history lesson more than a “this is how you get started” lesson. The reason I’ve watched it twice, other than it being intriguing, is so I could take notes the second time ’round to get a better idea of what I could tell you guys about it.

We start off with something of a cocaphony of talking heads.

Rest Here




Linux For Dummies

I keep one or two Linux books close to my computer in case I have to look up the syntax of some obscure Unix command or concept. My copy of Linux for Dummies is a 3rd edition copyrighted in 2000.

The "Dummies" and "Complete Idiots" books are often authored by some pretty competent people. These days you can easily spend $40 - $50 on a computer text, but the cheaper Dummie book might be all you need.

Yey, Linux for Dummies :)

My first experience with linux was building a home PC from parts and trying to install linux on it...

I got a dummies book with a redhat install (7 or 8 I think), been a few years now.
(Would probably still have been on windows hadn't I got that book Big Grin)

It was relatively painful as I spent a month before I was confident enough to patch and compile my own driver for my intel modem... and that was a big download @ 700kb(ish)

Still remember booting into linux only in my spare time to see what I could get working on it.

Ahhh the nostalgia...

Now I have one of the pocket guides to linux (£3) or just use $man some_prog

I recommend cheap and concise books as my house mates have 'stolen' my *nix books to help with work on their final year dissertations Laughing

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