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7 Reasons Why Pirates Should Jump Ship to Open Source

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OSS

It has always amazed me how many people pirate. As the well-known anti-piracy video clip says, "You wouldn't steal a car, you wouldn't steal a handbag," but people do regularly steal software and other copyrighted materials. They seem to have an innate belief that software should be free.

Technically, pirates don't steal - they infringe copyright. Neither do they rape, pillage, sink ships, or make people walk the plank into shark-infested waters. The "pirate" label seems to be part of an unsuccessful campaign to encourage people to pay for intellectual property. Calling people names rarely works.

And copyright infringers have a very long list of reasons or excuses to justify their behaviour. Most of these hinge on the fact that when stealing intellectual property, you are not depriving someone else of their property as you would if you stole their car.digiKam

  • "It doesn't hurt anyone."
  • "Those big companies can afford it anyway."
  • "No one lost any money if I was never going to buy it."
  • "If they want me to buy it they should make it cheaper."
  • "I'm making their product more popular by using it."

Many people who pirate feel they have no option. Rather than addressing these issues, I'd like to introduce another: Pirates should consider using open-source software. And here is why.

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Arrrrr...

Don't "pirates" only exist in Somalia now?

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