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The Knoppix Advantage

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There is a great deal of discussion going on about which distribution is most ideal for the desktop, with people taking different sides. If you ask me, Knoppix scores over other distros when it comes to installing Linux on old machines. Let me elaborate on how I reached this conclusion.

Recently, I received a Knoppix Ver 4.0 live CD from a friend. And I decided to try it out on one of my older computers. The computer has a Celeron 333 MHz processor, with 96 MB SDRAM, Microsoft Serial IntelliMouse, Aztec 2320 chipset based ISA sound card and 440LX Intel Original motherboard - In short, a really old machine in today's standards. In the past, I have had lots of trouble in installing Linux (which includes Fedora and Ubuntu) on this machine especially problems with sound and mouse, each time having to tweak the configuration files to get both working . But when I popped in the Knoppix live CD, I was amazed to see it detecting both my sound card and mouse correctly. In fact, I saw it booting into KDE (the default window manager) without prompting for any user input.

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