Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Nominating SimplyMEPIS as the desktop distro of choice

Filed under
Others

http://www.tuxmachines.org/node/33321 has been holding a poll on the late 2008 favorite distro. As one may guess, the Ubuntu family easily holds the lead in the poll, and has continued to do so at every juncture.

While I believe, on one hand, that every single one of the systems mentioned in the poll is excellent, I also believe that some of them are better at certain tasks than others. To me, the BSDs are great server systems. A few of them, such as PC-BSD and DesktopBSD have been created to make the desktop experience a bit easier to get into, but let's face it. BSD does servers really well. It can handle the desktop well, but that is mostly a function of what you put into it yourself.

Fedora, also being primarily the community and development arm of Red Hat, is also more focused on the server environment, though you can put together an excellent desktop with it.

For me, I really enjoy Debian based software. But plain Debian is also best suited for servers, even though you can make an excellent desktop from the software contained in Debian repositories.

So what makes a great desktop system right out of the box? Well, Ubuntu is popular for that, but the one that I really like is SimplyMEPIS. Why? It is really easy to install, and beyond that, it is extremely well designed, carefully engineered, with quality and usability in mind. What desktop user does not appreciate those traits in a desktop system? I assert that while many of these systems can do the desktop well, SimplyMEPIS does it cleaner and with higher quality than anyone else, and that is why I give it my vote and I've written this note to suggest that you take a look at it and see if you agree with me. The current release candidate, SimplyMEPIS 8.0 RC 1 should be released soon, but it is such a superior effort that the RC exceeds the desktop quality of most of the other alternatives, even now. Try it and test out my claim.

hello, SimplyMEPIS is a nice

hello,
SimplyMEPIS is a nice distro.
but SimplyMEPIS 8.0 have a big problem with wifi : it'snt stable or non functionnaly ! it's now to have some distro that offer good wifi for laptop. the wifi is better on slackware with wicd !

@+ petitbob

masinick

masinick wrote:
http://www.tuxmachines.org/node/33321 has been holding a poll on the late 2008 favorite distro. As one may guess, the Ubuntu family easily holds the lead in the poll, and has continued to do so at every juncture.

While I believe, on one hand, that every single one of the systems mentioned in the poll is excellent, I also believe that some of them are better at certain tasks than others. To me, the BSDs are great server systems. A few of them, such as PC-BSD and DesktopBSD have been created to make the desktop experience a bit easier to get into, but let's face it. BSD does servers really well. It can handle the desktop well, but that is mostly a function of what you put into it yourself.

Fedora, also being primarily the community and development arm of Red Hat, is also more focused on the server environment, though you can put together an excellent desktop with it.

For me, I really enjoy Debian based software. But plain Debian is also best suited for servers, even though you can make an excellent desktop from the software contained in Debian repositories.

So what makes a great desktop system right out of the box? Well, Ubuntu is popular for that, but the one that I really like is SimplyMEPIS. Why? It is really easy to install, and beyond that, it is extremely well designed, carefully engineered, with quality and usability in mind. What desktop user does not appreciate those traits in a desktop system? I assert that while many of these systems can do the desktop well, SimplyMEPIS does it cleaner and with higher quality than anyone else, and that is why I give it my vote and I've written this note to suggest that you take a look at it and see if you agree with me. The current release candidate, SimplyMEPIS 8.0 RC 1 should be released soon, but it is such a superior effort that the RC exceeds the desktop quality of most of the other alternatives, even now. Try it and test out my claim.


Brian Masinick

You can get this software at http://www.mepis.org/node/1462

More in Tux Machines

Raspberry Pi analog input board has weather station option

RasPi.TV has Kickstartered a $12 “RasPiO Analog Zero” Raspberry Pi add-on board the size of an Raspberry Pi Zero. It offers eight 10-bit analog inputs. The RasPiO Analog Zero has surpassed its Kickstarter goals, and is available through May 31 starting at 8 Pounds ($12). Designed for reading up to eight analog sensors simultaneously on a Raspberry Pi, the add-on board is matched to the size of the 65 x 30mm Raspberry Pi Zero. However, it plugs into any Pi with a 40-pin expansion connector, and can work with older 26-pin Pi models with the help of an adapter. Read more

GhostBSD 10.3 Development Continues, Now with UEFI Support for 64-bit Platforms

Today, May 25, 2016, GhostBSD maintainer Eric Turgeon announced the general availability of the second Alpha release of the upcoming GhostBSD 10.3 operating system. Read more

Samsung still undecided on their Android Wear future

Yesterday the Internet lit up like a Christmas tree with the news that Samsung was no longer going to use Android Wear for any of its Smartwatches, but it seems that might not be quite the case. The report from Fast Company cited some Samsung executives confirming that Samsung was not looking into developing any further Android Wear products. Now, In a statement provided to the Engadget website Samsung states: “We disagree with Fast Company’s interpretation. Samsung has not made any announcement concerning Android Wear and we have not changed our commitment to any of our platforms.” Read more

Meizu Pro 5 Ubuntu Edition review

The Meizu Pro 5 is the latest flagship smartphone to run on Canonical’s Ubuntu operating system. Ubuntu is designed to work across all device types – including mobile, tablets, convertibles and desktops – using a common core code. This is similar to Microsoft Windows 10 Mobile. However, unlike Microsoft’s code, Ubuntu is totally open source and has largely been developed and improved by the desktop OS’s millions-strong user base. This means the OS is capable of evolving and changing at a great pace and has update cycles that would make most sysadmins weep. Read more