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Linspire will replace Windows with crippled Linux - cheap

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Linux

If Microsoft makes good on its self-destructive threat to pull Windows from the South Korean market rather than accede to local damands to un-bundle its proprietary media and IM apps, there's a safe harbour waiting in the form of blanket, country-wide licenses for the OS formerly known as Lindows.

"South Korea could save around a quarter of a billion dollars. More importantly, however, it would break South Korea loose from the monopolistic grasp of Microsoft, which the country currently finds itself under," Carmony explains.

We'll forget that one is more likely to be found in a grasp than under it. We'll forget as well that President Roh has, since assuming office, been chucked from the Blue House by an angry National Assembly, and later returned to it, politically crippled, by an even angrier Constitutional Court, and likely has little time to fret about the software loaded on Korean computers. Ministry of Information and Communication Director Hyung Tae-gun would have been a more realistic and productive target of the letter, but no matter. We're delighted to see former Lindows/Linspire CEO Michael Robertson's variety of strenuous Yankee hucksterism and publicity bird-dogging passing so smoothly to his successor.

Admittedly, by reporting this blatant publicity stunt, we're fueling it to some extent, and that makes us a tad uncomfortable.

Full Story.

Linspire

I was in CompUSA last night and next to the Green and Blue Windows XP and XP Professional boxes were the same BLUE AND GREEN Linspire boxes. One was Linspire Basic and the other was Linspire CNR. If you weren't paying attention you wouldn't be able to tell the boxes apart. Man they are on their game for sure.

re: Linspire experience?

I tested it out not too long ago and was surprised how nice it really was.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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